A joke to lighten up your day.

Swedes always mock our beautiful language saying it’s ugly and stiff, likewise not many Finns can call Swedish beautifully flowing noise. So, which one is more beautiful to foreign ears?

To find this out it was decided to, in the name of Nordic cooperation, make an unbiased test.

The international jury shaped a simple English sentence that would be then translated to Finnish and Swedish. The sentence was the following: “Island, island, grassy island; grassy island maiden.”

The same in Finnish: “Saari, saari, heinäsaari: heinäsaaren neito.”

The same in Swedish: “Ö, ö, hö ö; hö ö mö.”

The jury is still out on the verdict because the members of the international jury haven’t been able to stop laughing.


Cruise trips
Ruotsinlaiva, “Sweden’s ship”, is a name used for passenger ships, usually cruise ships, that operate between Stockholm (Sweden’s capitol) and one of Finland’s cities (Helsinki, Turku or Marienhamn). Cruises to Stockholm are very popular and it’s almost an obligation for every Finn to do so. The trip across and back the Baltic sea takes about three days. You leave in the evening, sleep the night and in the morning you are in Stockholm. The cruise stays put for few hours and then sets off back to Helsinki. Usually in the night, the cruise makes a stop in Marienhamn.
Now, you may think it seems oh so nice to visit a neighboring country like that and to see new cities but that’s not the reason Finnish people go on these cruises. The real reason is to get drunk. We Finns love nothing more than getting drunk. Of course there are exceptions, like families with young children but then the parents go on another cruise where they can get wasted. Then after the first night of partying, you sleep your hangover, not leaving the ship at all, and then do it again the next night.
Then there’s also tax-free where you can buy, well, tax-free goods. I usually buy Milka chocolate bars because no one sells them in Finland.
Abiristeily. Abi means someone who’s a senior in high school and when you add risteily, a cruise, to the mix you get a nice combination. It’s a tradition that during the third and last year of high school the students go on a cruise to celebrate it. Americans have proms and whatnot, we go on a cruise to get wasted. Recently it’s become a trend for freshmen and second year students to go on cruises as well. My lovely mother didn’t let me go on the first two but luckily, now that I’m 18 and can legally drink, I can go to the Abiristeily. The format is same for these cruises than the one with normal cruises.
Tallinnanlaiva, “Tallinn’s ship”, is a name used for cruises that operate between Tallinn, Estonia’s capitol, and Helsinki. These trips differ from trips to Stockholm in many ways. The trip to Tallinn and back lasts about 14 hours so the time to partying usually is on the way back. But one of the main reasons Finns go there is to buy cheap alcohol. See, in Finland all the heavy stuff is sold in Alkos, government owned stores. So, the government usually taxes them highly so that the tax is like half of the price. Estonia’s economy was and still is, compared to Finland’s, worse so they have cheap alcohol. Going to Tallinn for this reason is also very popular among under 20 year olds. You see, the limit to buy over 40%, the heavy stuff, is 20, so of course Tallinn is the perfect solution for this.
How much does theses cruises cost? Trip to Stockholm, depending on the company you use and the type of cabin you want, is around 60 to 100 Euros. Tallinn is cheaper, the lowest I’ve had was 15 Euros.
So, here you have it. One of the many interesting aspects of Finnish culture that may seem odd to people who are from countries with no coast-lines or have cruises that are very expensive. I reccomend going on a cruise to Stockholm if you ever happen to be in Helsinki. Then you get to see the Finn in its natural habitat. :D

Cruise trips

Ruotsinlaiva, “Sweden’s ship”, is a name used for passenger ships, usually cruise ships, that operate between Stockholm (Sweden’s capitol) and one of Finland’s cities (Helsinki, Turku or Marienhamn). Cruises to Stockholm are very popular and it’s almost an obligation for every Finn to do so. The trip across and back the Baltic sea takes about three days. You leave in the evening, sleep the night and in the morning you are in Stockholm. The cruise stays put for few hours and then sets off back to Helsinki. Usually in the night, the cruise makes a stop in Marienhamn.

Now, you may think it seems oh so nice to visit a neighboring country like that and to see new cities but that’s not the reason Finnish people go on these cruises. The real reason is to get drunk. We Finns love nothing more than getting drunk. Of course there are exceptions, like families with young children but then the parents go on another cruise where they can get wasted. Then after the first night of partying, you sleep your hangover, not leaving the ship at all, and then do it again the next night.

Then there’s also tax-free where you can buy, well, tax-free goods. I usually buy Milka chocolate bars because no one sells them in Finland.

Abiristeily. Abi means someone who’s a senior in high school and when you add risteily, a cruise, to the mix you get a nice combination. It’s a tradition that during the third and last year of high school the students go on a cruise to celebrate it. Americans have proms and whatnot, we go on a cruise to get wasted. Recently it’s become a trend for freshmen and second year students to go on cruises as well. My lovely mother didn’t let me go on the first two but luckily, now that I’m 18 and can legally drink, I can go to the Abiristeily. The format is same for these cruises than the one with normal cruises.

Tallinnanlaiva, “Tallinn’s ship”, is a name used for cruises that operate between Tallinn, Estonia’s capitol, and Helsinki. These trips differ from trips to Stockholm in many ways. The trip to Tallinn and back lasts about 14 hours so the time to partying usually is on the way back. But one of the main reasons Finns go there is to buy cheap alcohol. See, in Finland all the heavy stuff is sold in Alkos, government owned stores. So, the government usually taxes them highly so that the tax is like half of the price. Estonia’s economy was and still is, compared to Finland’s, worse so they have cheap alcohol. Going to Tallinn for this reason is also very popular among under 20 year olds. You see, the limit to buy over 40%, the heavy stuff, is 20, so of course Tallinn is the perfect solution for this.

How much does theses cruises cost? Trip to Stockholm, depending on the company you use and the type of cabin you want, is around 60 to 100 Euros. Tallinn is cheaper, the lowest I’ve had was 15 Euros.

So, here you have it. One of the many interesting aspects of Finnish culture that may seem odd to people who are from countries with no coast-lines or have cruises that are very expensive. I reccomend going on a cruise to Stockholm if you ever happen to be in Helsinki. Then you get to see the Finn in its natural habitat. :D


Putous
Putous, meaning a fall or a drop, is a very popular Finnish sketch comedy TV show. It’s format is simple: the same actors do different kind of sketches for an hour and a half, including improvisations, and the show has a Sketch Character of the Year contest where the actors come up with a sketch character that they play in different kind of situations. Every week the viewers get to vote for their favorite and the one to get the least votes “falls out” (the name of the show comes from it).
It has been going on since January 2010 and has about eight episodes per season. Like I said, it’s very popular among Finnish viewers, and it’s one of the most viewed shows on MTV3 (a Finnish television channel which I will post about later). It gets a little under million viewers which is a lot since Finland’s population is about five million. Also, many teenagers and school children pick up on the catch-phrases these sketch characters use on the show (one not-so-young who used them was one of our presidential candidate during an interview), and sometimes the winner sketch character gets more publicity after the show ends, like one character got a TV show and some have released albums.
The show sometimes gets special guests, more than before during the third season which is going on at the moment. They have had three presidential candidates and many musical guests that show up in the middle of an improvisation.
The people in the picture are some of the current sketch characters. Only four are still left. I can’t say which one is my favourite because they are all so good and funny and I would like for them all to win.
Now, this show’s humour is mainly for Finnish people and some of the sketches would be difficult to explain to a foreigner. They use a lot of puns and other word plays, especially suggestive language that would be even more difficult to explain or translate.
One last thing about this show is that it has a bigger female presence than one would guess for a comedy show. The show has noted on this few times in the past and used it in their jokes. Currently it’s divided equally, 4-4, and I hope it stays that way.

Putous

Putous, meaning a fall or a drop, is a very popular Finnish sketch comedy TV show. It’s format is simple: the same actors do different kind of sketches for an hour and a half, including improvisations, and the show has a Sketch Character of the Year contest where the actors come up with a sketch character that they play in different kind of situations. Every week the viewers get to vote for their favorite and the one to get the least votes “falls out” (the name of the show comes from it).

It has been going on since January 2010 and has about eight episodes per season. Like I said, it’s very popular among Finnish viewers, and it’s one of the most viewed shows on MTV3 (a Finnish television channel which I will post about later). It gets a little under million viewers which is a lot since Finland’s population is about five million. Also, many teenagers and school children pick up on the catch-phrases these sketch characters use on the show (one not-so-young who used them was one of our presidential candidate during an interview), and sometimes the winner sketch character gets more publicity after the show ends, like one character got a TV show and some have released albums.

The show sometimes gets special guests, more than before during the third season which is going on at the moment. They have had three presidential candidates and many musical guests that show up in the middle of an improvisation.

The people in the picture are some of the current sketch characters. Only four are still left. I can’t say which one is my favourite because they are all so good and funny and I would like for them all to win.

Now, this show’s humour is mainly for Finnish people and some of the sketches would be difficult to explain to a foreigner. They use a lot of puns and other word plays, especially suggestive language that would be even more difficult to explain or translate.

One last thing about this show is that it has a bigger female presence than one would guess for a comedy show. The show has noted on this few times in the past and used it in their jokes. Currently it’s divided equally, 4-4, and I hope it stays that way.


Introduction

Hi, I’m a 18 year old Finnish girl from Helsinki, and this blog will be mostly about Finland, Finnish people, the language and the culture.

I try to be as informative and creative as possible in my posts to give you a full understanding of Finland. Submissions and questions are always welcome.

Since I am still an Abi (abiturientti) i.e. a senior in high school, I will mainly post from the perspective of a young adult, and also because I’m from Helsinki I’ll mainly talk about that city and not others (especially Vantaa because, duh, who cares?).

Also my English can be a little rough at the beginning but I still hope you can understand what I’m trying to say.

Thanks for reading and if you have any questions, ask away!